A message from our Chair of Trustees

As I write this blog I am lucky enough to be outside in my garden on a warm summer day. There is life burgeoning all around me - bees buzzing, birds singing and a wasp grazing my picnic table.

For wildlife, the horrors of Covid-19 seem far removed. And for some species, the lack of human disturbance may even have been a benefit – think deer in city streets and cuckoos in urban parks. And as wildlife has got closer to people, our appreciation of the natural environment has grown. Stories of encounters with wildlife and the clarity of bird song are all over the internet. With the easing of lockdown in England, thousands of people are heading for the peace and relaxation of our countryside and beaches, an instinctive remedy for weeks of anxiety and restriction and a comfort for sufferers. There is now an abundance of evidence that our ‘Natural Heath Service’ is good for us all!

Nature is quick to take opportunities but sadly the places and spaces often aren’t there anymore. The ecological and climate emergencies haven't gone away – they just aren’t in the headlines. We still need to protect, enhance and join up our wild ‘nature networks’ for ourselves and the creatures and plants we share this planet with.

Early bumblebee

Photo, Jon Hawkins - Surrey Hills Photography

So despite the difficult circumstances we all face, the Devon Wildlife Trust is still working hard for nature and we will continue to do so to the best of our ability, but safely and responsibly. Ongoing work includes our Action for Insects campaign which is currently promoting action that you can take to help reverse the decline in insects (especially pollinators); establishing a new tree nursery at Meeth Quarry nature reserve to help replace trees lost across Devon to ash dieback; and of course we are continuing to look after our 57 nature reserves throughout the county. Here we have kept public access open to most of our reserves and have just reopened our carparks.  And we are finding innovative ways to continue our face-to-face work virtually – for example see the education pages on our web site or sign up and share ‘Thirty Days Wild’ this June.

Exciting times lie ahead with opportunities for ‘green’ recovery; to rebuild the world we want in a sustainable way that is more resilient to epidemics and disasters and kinder to ourselves and other species. Our work goes on, thanks to widespread support from people like you. I hope you are able to enjoy the nature renewal, be it from a garden, a window or web cam, and find solace in our natural world. We need your support now more than ever.

Thank you.

Suzanne Goodfellow

 

Chair of the Board of Trustees

Devon Wildlife Trust